Dear readers,

                     It gives me immense pleasure to welcome all to explore our weekly e-health magazine “Health Mate”. We intend to publish health awareness articles, review articles, case reports and research papers. Our objective is to reach general population, medical practitioners and paramedics. Our main aim is to promote scientific papers of good quality and we extend our boundaries to medical and allied sciences. Finally I thank my editorial team , technical team, authors and well wishers who are promoting this e-magazine. I conclude and promise that the standard policies will be maintained.

EDITOR IN CHIEF

Dr RusheeKanta Mohanta (MD.DM.)

Role Of Nursing Staff In Diabetic Care

NOV16-23(3)
Date : 11/19/2020
Author : Dr. Manjulata Mahanta (MD Pediatrics, Sr Nephrology)
Publisher : Heartmate
Share :
Volume No : 23 Issue No : 3
Our Readers :

Diabetes has become an increasingly serious health issue on a global scale, with the number of people living with diabetes rising significantly over the last 35 years. Nursing staff have an important role and clear responsibilities when treating patients with diabetes or who are having tests to diagnose diabetes. This role and associated responsibilities will be specified in local workplace guidance and policies and by each member of the nursing team's level of competence.

Role of nurse in diabetic care

Screening, prevention and early detection of type 2 diabetes: The role of Nursing staff is to educate people 

  • · Describe the risk factors for type 2 diabetes
  • · Explain the importance of prevention or delay of onset of type 2 diabetes in individuals at risk
  • · Explain the role that exercise plays in the prevention of, or delay in progression to, type 2 diabetes
  • · Explain the importance of weight control and the role that diet plays in the prevention of, or delay in progression to, type 2 diabetes.

Promoting self-care

In order to support the patient to self-care their diabetes nursing staff  should be able to:

  • · Support the patient and help them develop their own self-care with guidance from a registered nurse
  • · Observe and report any concerns that you may have about a patient that would affect their ability to self-care
  • · Encourage patients to use their personalised care plans.

Mental health

To care for someone with diabetes and mental illness is very important part. All should be able to:

· Have an understanding and awareness of how mental health issues, such as depression and anxiety, can affect people with diabetes

· Report any changes that you notice in the patient’s normal mental health, to a registered nurse or doctor. This could include changes in medications adherence, mood and appearance and also anxiety.

Nutrition

To meet your patient’s individual nutritional needs we  should be able to:

  • · Identify foods and drinks with high sugar content
  • · Follow the nutritional plan and report any related problems
  • · Measure and record the waist circumference, height and weight of your patient accurately
  • · Report if meals are not eaten, especially carbohydrates, if the patient is using insulin or blood glucose lowering therapies.

Urine monitoring

For the safe use of urine glucose or ketone monitoring and associated equipment you should be able to:

  • · Perform the test according to the manufacturers’ instructions and local guidelines
  • · Perform the test unsupervised at the request of a registered nurse
  • · Document and report the results following local guidelines and procedures.

Blood glucose monitoring

For the safe use of blood glucose monitoring and associated equipment you should be able to:

  • · Perform the test according to manufacturers’ instructions and local guidelines
  • · Perform the test unsupervised, at the request of a registered nurse
  • · Document and report the result according to local guidelines and procedures
  • · Recognise and follow local quality assurance procedure, including disposal of sharps
  • · Recognisehypoglycaemia and be able to administer glucose
  • · Understand the normal range of glycaemia and report any readings outside this range to the appropriate person.

Oral therapies

For the safe administration and use of oral antihyperglycaemic medication you should be able to:

  • · Describe the effect an oral antihyperglycaemic agent has on blood glucose levels
  • · Demonstrate an understanding of the on-going nature of the therapy
  • · Report any identified problems appropriately
  • · Recognise the signs of hypoglycaemia and administer glucose

Injectable therapies

For the safe administration and use of insulin and GLP-1 receptor agonists you should be able to:

  • · Describe the effect of insulin on blood glucose levels
  • · Be aware of local sharps disposal policy
  • · Show and understanding of the on-going nature of the therapy
  • · Administer insulin competently where supported by local policy
  • · Report identified problems appropriately
  • · All nursing staff who handle prescribe or administer insulin should undertake a training course e.g. NHS Diabetes - safe use of insulin e- learning.

Hypoglycaemia

  • · State the normal blood glucose range
  • · Describe the mild and severe signs and symptoms of hypoglycaemia
  • · Demonstrate competent use of blood glucose monitoring equipment to confirm hypoglycaemia
  • · Offer appropriate treatment as per local guidelines
  • · Know where treatment for hypoglycaemia is stored
  • · Reassure and comfort the person with diabetes and their carer
  • · Document and report a hypoglycaemia event to a registered nurse
  • · Recognise that older people may not demonstrate clear signs and symptoms of hypoglycaemia
  • · If the person with diabetes is unresponsive, ensure their airway is clear and call emergency services.

Hyperglycaemia

For the identification and treatment of hyperglycaemia you should be able to:

  • · State the normal blood glucose range
  • · Describe the signs and symptoms of hyperglycaemia
  • · Perform blood and ketone tests according to local guidelines
  • · Correctly document the results and report those out of the accepted range to the appropriate person
  • · Recognise that older people may asymptomatic of hyperglycaemia.

 

Dr Manjulata Mahanta.

MD Pediatrics, Sr Nephrology.

Felloship In Dialysis.

Post Graduate Diploma In Diabetes And Renal Management.

 




Plot No B/1514, Sector 6, CDA Cuttack, Odisha
  • +91-9040283301/+91-9040183301
  • contact@heartmate.co.in

Facilities Available